Untitled (Stack 3-1) // 2018 // Archival Giclée - Hahnemühle // 150cm x 112cm (59" x 44")

info
×











The first geometric hay bales appeared on the landscape during the industrial revolution, when we humans strongly believed in ourselves as a benevolent force, when plenty was starting to become our central aspiration and when our impact on the climate is thought to have begun. I chose to make these images – darker echoes of Monet’s haystacks – in black and white, like the early daguerreotypes of ancient Greek monuments or the industrial forms captured by Hilla and Bernd Becher. I found, on closer inspection, that each one of these straw monoliths reveals itself as a poignantly individual portrait. I find hope in this; in our relentless impulse to scan our surroundings for interconnection. I also discovered, talking to a local farmworker, that there’s an art to stacking bales: too high or too wide and during the curing process the build-up of heat in the centre can become so intense, that they can spontaneously combust.

BN 01.06.19

Untitled (Stack 4-1) // 2018 // Archival Giclée- Hahnemühle // 150cm x 112cm (59" x 44")

info
×

Untitled (Stack 5-1) // 2018 // Archival Giclée- Hahnemühle // 150cm x 112cm (59" x 44")

info
×

Untitled (Stack 6-1) // 2018 // Archival Giclée // 150cm x 112cm (59" x 44")

info
×

Untitled (Stack 7-1) // 2018 // Archival Giclée- Hahnemühle // 150cm x 112cm (59" x 44")

info
×

Untitled (Stack 3-2) // 2018 // Archival Giclée- Hahnemühle // 150cm x 120cm (59" x 47")

info
×

Untitled (Stack 4-2) // 2018 // Archival Giclée- Hahnemühle // 150cm x 120cm (59" x 47")

info
×

Untitled (Stack 5-2) // 2018 // Archival Giclée- Hahnemühle // 150cm x 120cm (59" x 47")

info
×

Untitled (Stack 6-2) // 2018 // Archival Giclée- Hahnemühle // 150cm x 120cm (59" x 47")

info
×

Untitled (Stack 7-2) // 2018 // Archival Giclée- Hahnemühle // 150cm x 120cm (59" x 47")

info
×
Using Format